Little Tales of Misogyny by Patricia Highsmith

Patricia Highsmith is best known as the author of the bestselling Tom Ripley series, which has inspired several movies.

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Little Tales of Misogyny by Patricia Highsmith


Features

  • Paperback: 128 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.35 x 8.32 x 5.54
  • Publisher: W.W. Norton & Company; (August 2002)
  • ISBN: 0393323374


    About the Author
    Patricia Highsmith is the author of such classics as Strangers on a Train and The Talented Mr. Ripley. She died in 1995 in Locarno, Switzerland.


    Book Description
    Long out of print, this Highsmith classic resurfaces with a vengeance. The great revival of interest in Patricia Highsmith continues with the publication of this legendary, cultish short story collection. With an eerie simplicity of style, Highsmith turns our next-door neighbors into sadistic psychopaths, lying in wait among white picket fences and manicured lawns. In the darkly satiric, often mordantly hilarious sketches that make up Little Tales of Misogyny, Highsmith upsets our conventional notions of female character, revealing the devastating power of these once familiar creatures—"The Dancer," "The Female Novelist," "The Prude"—who destroy both themselves and the men around them. This work attesets to Highsmith's reputation as "the poet of apprehension" (Graham Greene).


    Reader Reviews
    1 of 1 people found the following review helpful: More misanthropic than misogynistic, December 20, 2002 Reviewer: Timothy Hulsey from Charlottesville, VA United States Much of Patricia Highsmith's writing proceeds from one simple idea: that with intense effort and single-minded determination, even the most unremarkable people can manage to ruin not only their own lives, but the lives of everyone around them as well. One need look no further than this slim collection of short fables to make the point. Whether it's "Oona the Jolly Cave Woman," hapless Elaine in "The Breeder," or a truly malevolent creature like Thea in "The Perfect Little Lady," all of the main characters in these short stories display an insatiable appetite for destruction. Although the title suggests that this book is misogynistic, the men in this collection aren't necessarily any better than the women. Highsmith's deep misanthropy can (and does) get monotonous, but with such gemlike stories as "The Hand" and "The Prude" in this collection, the book gives little cause for complaint.

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