Three Complete Novels: The Andromeda Strain, The Terminal Man, and The Great Train Robbery by Michael Crichton

Best known as the author of The Andromedia Strain and Jurassic Park, Michael Crichton is the award-winning, bestselling author dubbed "the father of the techno-thriller."

Three Complete Novels: The Andromeda Strain, The Terminal Man, and The Great Train Robbery by Michael Crichton is available. Click for more info or to buy it now.

Three Complete Novels: The Andromeda Strain, The Terminal Man, and The Great Train Robbery by Michael Crichton


Features

  • Hardcover: 688 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): 2.13 x 9.54 x 6.36
  • Publisher: Wings Press; (March 1993)
  • ISBN: 0517084791

    Reader Reviews
    Terminal Man, nostolgic but still relevant, May 21, 2003 Reviewer: Atheen Hills from Mpls, MN United States Although the Terminal Man is a little dated (1972), it was definitely a fun book. I have worked in a university hospital most of my working life-in fact the U of M is mentioned in passing in the book-and started my career in neurology. It was fun revisiting the medical world of the 70s. Some of the tests and equipment that the character Benson underwent bring back memories. Some have changed considerably since that time, and some are no longer used. The lounging chair in which Mr Benson had air forced into his spine to enlarge and visualize his ventricles was called the pneumoenchephologram. So passe is that exam these days, that when I asked a medical student if he had ever heard of it, he was honestly puzzled by the reference . Interesting too were the "futuristic" devices that the author predicted in the book. Some of them or variants of them are in fact available now, small implantable batteries for pacemakers that can last for years for one. In other cases, what is available is actually better. At the time of the action of Terminal Man, the now ubiquitous CAT scan had only just begun to appear as cutting edge technology in it's first generation form called the ACTA scan. The MRI, if it existed at all, was probably still in experimental form if not still on the drawing board. The concept of what might more easily be described as a brain "defibrillator" which is surgically implanted to stop intractable seizures is now being attempted as a course of treatment. They have also been tried as a treatment depression. Most interesting is the notion of interfacing living tissue with computer wires to effect behavior-in Crichton's book violent behavior-is now being done successfully according to recent information in Scientific American-in the latter case muscular movement. If nothing, else, Michael Crichton captures that sense of the boundless possibilities of expanding computer technology. I think he also brings to the forefront the moral and ethical issues that are bound to arise as science moves more and more into the arena of behavior, effecting what we believe we are as human beings. As in so many of Crichton's books, disaster follows when the hubris of science attempts to control nature, and simply having good intentions is not always adequate insurance that such disasters will not occur. As we face genetically altered plants and animals, genetically altered human beings, cloning and other types of human dictated changes in nature, these issues will come up more and more frequently. How we as a society, even as a world wide species, will greatly effect the world we and our children live in the future. Amazing book; still relevant.

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