Echo Burning by Lee Child

Lee Child's award-winning thrillers feature ex-military policeman Jack Reacher taking on the bad guys of the world when the law no longer can.

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Echo Burning by Lee Child


Features

  • Mass Market Paperback: 432 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): 1.22 x 6.79 x 4.17
  • Publisher: Jove Pubns; (April 30, 2002)
  • ISBN: 0515133310


    Amazon.com
    Jack Reacher is Spenser before Robert Parker domesticated his Boston PI--in fact, Reacher's even tougher than Hawk. He can inhale and exhale a few times and pump up his muscles so they make a bad character think twice about tangling with him. And he's spent enough time on the right side of the law to know how to operate in the gray zone if that's what it takes to save the fair maiden, punish the bad guys, and right any other wrongs he happens to encounter in the course of his wanderings. Echo Burning is vintage Lee Child, a smartly paced, intricately plotted, and masterfully characterized thriller starring Reacher, the ex-military cop who's so concerned about commitment to anything--a woman, possessions, a permanent address--that he only owns the clothes on his back. But he's the kind of justice-seeking guy you'd want on your side, especially if you were an abused wife trapped in a marriage you can't get out of until, and unless, somebody bumps off your old man.

    Reacher's sympathetic, but he's not crazy. Nonetheless, he allows himself to be drawn into beautiful Carmen Greer's orbit, which ought to teach a guy not to hitchhike. Agreeing to protect her from the husband who's about to be released from jail and, according to Carmen, who's about to pay her back for tipping off the authorities to the tax fraud that landed him in prison, Reacher moves into the bunkhouse of the Echo, Texas, ranch that's owned by the bigoted, bitter, but powerful Greer family, which despises Carmen because she's Mexican and tolerates her only because she's Sloop Greer's wife and the mother of his child. The expected bloodshed ensues, but it's Sloop, not Carmen, who ends up with a bullet in his head. Reacher's convinced that Carmen acted in self-defense, even after other evidence comes to light that suggests there's more--and less--to her unhappy tale than even her own lawyer believes. This is the best Jack Reacher yet, smart, stylish, and convincing. If it's your first encounter with Child's work, be sure to check out his backlist--Running Blind, Tripwire, etc. --Jane Adams --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

    Book Description
    Jack Reacher returns in Lee Child's new "rip-roaring thriller" (Denver Rocky Mountain News). This time, he's a hitchhiker picked up by a troubled beauty. And what happens between them has everybody talking.

    "Smashingly suspenseful...Child builds tension to unbearable extremes." (Kirkus Reviews, starred review)


    Reader Reviews
    3 of 3 people found the following review helpful: Jack Reacher, Modern Day Lone Ranger, October 20, 2003 Reviewer: Ken Douglas from the Pacific Northwest In our hearts, if we're guys, we want to be Jack Reacher. Heck, I bet even a lotta gals wouldn't mind being him. Here's a guy from nowhere, going everywhere, or is he from everywhere going nowhere. Whatever, he always seems to wind up somewhere where there is a damsel in distress, wrongs to right and plenty bad guys between him and truth, justice and the American way. Reacher, travels with only a tooth brush and sometimes not even that. He buys cheap clothes, wears them for a few days, tosses and replaces them. He has no roots, no possessions except his own sense of right and wrong. Laws? They're for other people. ECHO BURNING opens with Reacher climbing out of the back window of a sleazy motel as the cops drive by the front. Seems he broke the nose of one of them the night before. But it's small town West Texas, hotter than a branding iron outside, and the next town is miles down the road. Reacher sticks his thumb out with visions of spending the next ten years in a Texas slammer when a pretty young woman picks him up. What are the odds someone like that would pick up someone like him? There had to be a reason, Reacher muses. And before long she gives it to him. Her husband is in jail, gets out any day now and he's a wife beater. He beat her before he went in and she's afraid he'll take up right where he left off. She wants Reacher to kill him. Reacher says no, but agrees to kind of guard her. She brings Reacher home as a hired hand to help take care of the horses. Big bad guys who work for the ex want Reacher to take off. The husband's brother wants Reacher to split too. The sheriff doesn't like him and it's beginning to look like the woman might have made up the wife beating bit, but Reacher senses something isn't right and that's trouble for whoever gets in his way. Okay, I know the Reacher character is a little improbable, but I sure like him. I like the way he breezes into the picture, then fades out, a quiet Lone Ranger, only to show up in the next story, righting wrongs, making the unjust just. I like him a lot. I also like the clean and crisp writing style of Lee Child, like it lot. Ken Douglas, Underpaid Writer

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