Reflecting the Sky by S.J. Rozan

S.J. Rozan is the author of the Lydia Chin/Bill Smith Series, which has earned several major mystery awards.

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Reflecting the Sky by S.J. Rozan


Features

  • Mass Market Paperback: ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.85 x 6.79 x 4.23
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press; (January 2002)
  • ISBN: 0312981341


    Amazon.com
    S.J. Rozan's reputation grows with every new installment in her lively series starring the redoubtable Lydia Chin, a twentysomething New York PI and her partner Bill Smith. Here Lydia's venerable family friend Grandfather Gao dispatches the twosome to Hong Kong to deliver a jade amulet to the grandson of Wei Yao-Shi, whose American family knew nothing of the son and heir he left in Asia. A simple assignment quickly turns into a kidnapping, as Chin and Smith make their way through the complex world of triad politics, Asian intrigue, and the smuggling of Chinese antiquities. Along the way, Rozan treats us to an insider's view of Hong Kong; if someone you know is headed in that direction, this would be a great guidebook as well as a diverting plane read.

    The relationship between the two protagonists has a nice subtext; there's sufficient sexual tension to spice up the narrative, but not enough to slow down the action. Rozan excels at pacing, and her characters are complex enough to linger in the reader's mind after the last page is turned. This is a standout performance from a writer who ought to break out in the bestseller ranks with this eighth in a series that keeps getting better. --Jane Adams --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

    Book Description
    Hailed by Booklist as "a major figure in contemporary mystery fiction," Anthony and Shamus Award-winner S.J. Rozan-the only woman besides Sue Grafton to win the Shamus for Best Novel-continues to win universal acclaim for her Bill Smith/Lydia Chin series. And now the celebrated master of mystery turns her keen eye to the bustling, crowded streets of Hong Kong, where nothing is as it seems...

    It's a great honor when Grandfather Gao, a family friend and elder in New York's Chinatown community, asks Lydia Chin and her partner Bill Smith to go to Hong Kong to deliver the ashes of an old friend for burial, a letter from that friend to his brother, and a valuable jade figurine for the friend's seven-year-old grandson. But why would Grandfather Gao choose a PI, much less two, for such a simple mission? Lydia and Bill have even more questions when they arrive in Hong Kong and find the son's apartment ransacked-and the grandson missing. When two separate ransom demands are issued and the family tries to freeze them out, Lydia and Bill must try to solve a puzzle that seems to bear the unmistakable stamp of the Triads as they soon find themselves thrust headlong into the Hong Kong underworld where death is a way of life...

    Reader Reviews
    Interesting travelogue, shame about the plot, September 9, 2003 Reviewer: Trevor B Sunderland from Hong Kong Not one of Smith and Chin's better adventures. I think the author may have got caught up on the excitement of visiting HK and spent more time detailing the stereotypical attitudes the outside world has of Planet HK, of which I am resident. Basically, upon the death of a relative, Lydia Chin and Bill Smith visit HK to personally deliver several items as a favour to an elder family member. Upon arrival, they quickly become involved in a triad kidnapping, the hunt and the relatively innocuous resolution. The story is thin, weak and void of any real serious reader excitement. As mentioned, the author spends far too much space on describing the environment of Hong Kong and leaves no 'urban myth' unturned. Contrary to author belief, tea is not drank to the extent she would have us believe, people do not yell 'wai!' at the top of their voices into their mobile phones everytime they are answered, the sun does not set to the south behind the Peak (as in the rest of the world, it sets in the west), there is no elevated walkway linking the Furama Hotel to other buildings (indeed, and which would be unbeknownst to the author, there is now no Furama Hotel - having been knocked down in 2002 to make way for greater commercial interests) and people will not chastize you for walking too slow in the street. For a guide to HK, read Fodor's. For top notch Rozan, read 'Winter and Night.'

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