The Vanished (G K Hall Large Print Book Series (Paper)) [LARGE PRINT] by Bill Pronzini

Bill Pronzini is the author of the series featuring the Nameless Detective.

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The Vanished (G K Hall Large Print Book Series (Paper)) [LARGE PRINT] by Bill Pronzini


Features

  • Paperback: 236 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.53 x 8.42 x 5.39
  • Publisher: G K Hall & Co; Large Print edition (January 2000)
  • ISBN: 0783887663


    Reader Reviews
    The Nameless Detective Goes on a Man Hunt, October 20, 2003 Reviewer: Don Mitchell from a management consultant from Boston In 1971, author Bill Pronzini was only 27 when he wrote The Snatch, building on a shorter and different version of the story that appeared in the May 1969 issue of Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine under the same title. With the publication of this book, one of detective fiction's great characters was born with full fledged power and authenticity. If you have not yet read the Nameless Detective novels by Mr. Pronzini, you have a major treat ahead of you. Many of these are now out-of-print, so be sure to check your library for holdings in near-by cities. The Nameless Detective is referred to that way because Mr. Pronzini never supplies a name until late in the series, although he begins toying with the reader about this point in the fourth book in the series, Blowback. I won't reveal that name here. Mr. Pronzini presents a world in which many men take evil actions to further selfish interests, and many women and children suffer because of that selfishness. The police and private investigators suffer along with the victims, for evil-doing has painful consequences for everyone. Mr. Pronzini's plots are complex, yet he provides plenty of clues to help you identify the evil-doer on your own. Despite the transparency of many plots, he successfully uses plot complications to keep the action interesting and fresh. But the reason to read the books is because of the character development for the Nameless Detective. Nameless is a former police officer in San Francisco who collects pulp fiction about tough private detectives. Overcome by the evil he sees as a police officer and drawn to the complex imagery of the strong, silent hero who rights wrongs, Nameless tries to live that role as a private detective. But he has trouble getting clients, and operating as a one-man shop causes him to lead a lonely existence. In his personal life, his career keeps women at a distance. Like a medieval knight errant, he sticks to his vows and pursues doing the right thing . . . even when it doesn't pay. At the same time, he's very aware of art, culture and popular trends. And he doesn't like much of what he sees. At the same time, he's troubled by a hacking cough that cigarettes make worse . . . but doesn't really want to know what causes his phlegm to rise. The books are also written in a more sophisticated version of the pulp fiction style, employing greater style through language and plot. The whole experience is like looking at an image in a series of mirrors that reflect into infinity. These books are a must for those who love the noir style, and the modern fans of tough detectives with a heart of gold like Spenser . . . and can live without the wise cracks and repartee. In The Vanished, the second book in the Nameless Detective series, Elaine Kavanaugh hires Nameless to find her fiance, Master Sergeant Roy Sands, who mysteriously disappeared a few weeks earlier after mustering out of the service in San Francisco to wed her and live in California. The last clues to his whereabouts are three wires he sent from Eugene, Oregon to repay his buddies for gambling debts incurred on the flight home from Germany. Nameless goes to Oregon, and only finds a cold trail . . . ending in a duffel bag left behind in a prepaid hotel room. Suddenly, events turn even darker when someone breaks into Nameless's apartment to steal a drawing of Sands and both Elaine and he receive death threats over the telephone. Taking precautions to hide Elaine, Nameless takes the long polar flight through London to Germany from California and turns up an unexpected tale that opens up a new investigative path. The unraveling of the mystery fills in from there with wisps of clues, rather than whole clues . . . and Nameless connects the dots to find Sands. The story is both bold and subtle at the same time. The key mystery is out in the open from the beginning, and a careful reader will soon understand what might have happened in the broadest sense. The narrow sense of what happens will have to await the unfolding of the story . . . which makes the book hard to put down. I stayed up until past midnight to race to the end. Although the plot is not as complex and delicious as in The Snatch, The Vanished actually fits better with the Nameless character because there is more evil and evil-doing in this story to deal with. Anyone who reads this story will find their heart seared by the misdeeds . . . and their ugly consequences. Although he has done his duty in the end, Nameless pays a high emotional price for carrying on. And yet he does. After you recover from this hard-hitting story, think about where in your life others trust you . . . and what you must do to earn and maintain that trust and avoid causing harm to others. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title

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