Murder Richard 3 by Elizabeth Peters

Elizabeth Peters is the pseudonym used by author Barbara Mertz when writing her mysteries featuring archeologist and amateur detective Amelia Peabody.

Murder Richard 3 by Elizabeth Peters is available. Click for more info or to buy it now.

Murder Richard 3 by Elizabeth Peters


Features

  • Paperback: 240 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.68 x 6.75 x 4.19
  • Publisher: Warner Books; Reissue edition (August 1991)
  • ISBN: 0445402296


    Reader Reviews
    2 of 3 people found the following review helpful: Want a headache? Read this., July 21, 2002 Reviewer: green_melusine from Columbia, MO United States Thomas doesn't know why he isn't making any progress with lovely academic Jacqueline Kirby. Personally, I think it's because he's sort of patronizing, and because he checks out 20-year-olds in front of her face. But what do I know? Anyway, he invites her to a Ricardian party. He and a group of friends are avid fans of Richard III, and they are meeting to re-enact their favorite historical characters from the time period of his reign. As an added bonus, their host, Richard Weldon, promises to reveal a long-lost letter exonerating Richard III of the murders of his nephews. We meet the guests. In order to follow the story, we have to remember all of these folks' names--both first and last, since some of them are referred to by their first name in one sentence and their last name in the next. We also have to remember all their complex soap-operatic relationships. On top of that, to follow the story, we also have to keep track of which character they are impersonating, *and* how that person died. All of this, IMHO, is a pretty big outlay of brain cells for a 200-page "light read". A prankster begins staging fake "murders" based on the deaths of the various historical figures. These include such unlikely pranks as knocking a man out, then rigging up a pulley to dangle him headfirst into an empty wine barrel, thus referring to the Duke of Clarence's drowning in a cask of wine. That's a lot of trouble to go to. When I got to the end, I couldn't believe the culprit had gone to that much trouble for his/her goal. Several of the pranks are unrealistically complex. But they escalate, until Thomas and Jacqueline begin to suspect real danger at the manor. Will they figure out who is behind them before somebody really ends up dead? Overall, this is a contrived, unrealistic mystery which gets way too headache-inducing with all the different names one must remember--and I was *still* able to figure out the culprit fairly early on because only one person seemed to have a motive. I wondered why I had bothered trying to keep track of all the characters. In addition, the book is fraught with errors: proofreading errors ("King Richarad"), editing errors (something referred to on the back cover never actually happens), and continuity errors (a man admires a woman's tan one day, and her aristocratic pallor on the next). I do not recommend this book.

    More Info from AmazonBuy It from Amazon
    More Info from Amazon UKBuy Now from Amazon UK
    More Info from Amazon CanadaBuy Now from Amazon Canada

  •  


     

     



    Search Now:
    In Association with Amazon.com

    Search Now:
    In Association with Amazon.co.uk

    Search Now:
    In Association with amazon.ca
     

    Mystery Guild