Something More Than Night: The Case of Raymond Chandler by Raymond Chandler

Raymond Chandler's Phillip Marlowe was one of the characters who set the style for today's hard-boiled detective fiction.

Something More Than Night: The Case of Raymond Chandler by Raymond Chandler is available. Click for more info or to buy it now.

Something More Than Night: The Case of Raymond Chandler by Raymond Chandler


Features
Paperback

Reader Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful: If You're A Serious Chandler Fan, GRAB THIS BOOK!!, January 7, 2002 Reviewer: Paul Dana from San Francisco, CA USA Somewhere between the harshness of Frank McShane's biography and the apologetics of Tom Hiney's later work lies the true essence of Raymond Chandler. Wolfe's "Something Darker Than Night: The Case of Raymond Chandler" seeks to fill that gap, and -- I believe -- largely succeeds. Wolfe's approach to Chandler is to dissect his writings, which he does with all the analytical skills and precision of an English teacher (at the time of this book, Wolfe was associate professor of English at University of Missouri - St. Louis). Doing this, and unlike most other Chandler scholars, he refuses to take a single word or phrase at face value. He additionally resists the fairly common assumption that Chandler and Phillip Marlowe were "one and the same," or that Marlowe was at all times merely an alter-ego or "projection" of Chandler. As a result of both factors, both writer and creation emerge into the light as more fully rounded individuals. Wolfe does occasionally fall astray: In discussing "The Long Goodbye," for example, he notes that Marlowe, having relocated to a small house on Yucca Avenue, has "taken part in the 50s 'white flight to the suburbs'." In this -- which he subsequently conceded in correspondence -- Wolfe is victimized by an ignorance of Los Angeles history and demographics of that era. Likewise, in his otherwise excellent synopsis of "Double Indemnity" he neglects to distinguish between the original screenplay and the finished film version, a failing which can cause more than a moment's confusion for the reader who has seen the movie. Such flaws are minor considerations. Wolfe's study is refreshingly devoid of "personal agenda:" he neither excoriates nor excuses Chandler's personal failings. The result -- and Wolfe's great contribution -- is a volume which (whether or not you agree with all of his conclusions) will deepen your understanding of Chandler (and Marlowe) without dampening your enjoyment of either.

More Info from AmazonBuy It from Amazon
More Info from Amazon UKBuy Now from Amazon UK
More Info from Amazon CanadaBuy Now from Amazon Canada

 


 

 



Search Now:
In Association with Amazon.com

Search Now:
In Association with Amazon.co.uk

Search Now:
In Association with amazon.ca
 

Mystery Guild